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Creek Relation lost

Creek Relation lost

Posted: 1550542093000
Classification: Query
Edited: 1550670337000
Surnames: Gayton, Gaiten, Carroll
Our verbal family history says that my 2nd great grandmother Amanda Evaline Gayton/Gaiten (1861-1939), was Creek Indian. The story goes when she married Thomas Carroll in 1882 he made her remove her name from “tribal records”. The first place her name appears is the 1880 federal census record, Bartow Georgia, living WITH the Carroll Family she later marries into. Her relation to the head of the household says stepdaughter, I don't believe that. I would like any direction anyone may have to finding anymore information or starting points. I know she was treated poorly by the family as was my great grandmother. We would like to honor what she was forced to leave behind. Thank you for whatever help you may be able to give.

Re: Creek Relation lost

Posted: 1550575087000
Classification: Query
Amanda

The Creek Nation ceded all their lands in the southeast and removed west of the Mississippi around 30 years BEFORE your ancestor was born.
As a Sovereign Nation, the Creek People had many dealings with the Federal Government of the United States.
Subsequently, they have a very well documented history based on numerous Tribal Rolls and Records.

*** The story goes when she married Thomas Carroll in 1882 he made her remove her name from the tribal record. ***
Which 'tribal record' would this be ?


Kathy Roberts

Re: Creek Relation lost

Posted: 1550606344000
Classification: Query
I really don’t know, nor have any idea of any sort of records that my exist. My grandfather (her grandson) died in the early 90’s, I reached out to some other cousins looking for any info we may not have. All my mother knows is she was told he had her do that so the kids wouldn’t have access to any government “benefit” & would be considered “white” 😕.
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Re: Creek Relation lost

Posted: 1550670256000
Classification: Query
Amanda

In the early 1800s, the Creek Nation began ceding their lands in Alabama and Georgia to the United States, moving west of the Mississippi and re-establishing their Nation in Indian Territory.

By the mid 1830s, all Creek Nation lands had been ceded to the US.
At the time of your ancestor's birth in 1861, there was no longer a Creek Nation in the east, so there would be no 'tribal records'.

The Creek Nation is a Sovereign Nation, with their own constitution,laws etc., and does not get "government benefits".

American Indians not living within Tribal Lands are still considered Indian.


Kathy Roberts

Re: Creek Relation lost

Posted: 1553013546000
Classification: Query
To clarify further, Creek Nation was removed to Indian Territory in the 1830s. There were some Creeks who were able to remain in the southeast. Most, if not all of these people were mixed blood and gave up their tribal citizenship. As mentioned, there would be no Tribal records to remove anyone's name, not that one could have done that anyway, and there were no benefits available to anyone with Native ancestry in the southeast in the 1860s. She may or may not have had Creek ancestry. You aren't likely to find any sort of paper trail for that in that situation. I suggest taking a DNA test. You don't explain why you don't think George Carrol was her step-father. It would seem her Mother was Mary Eliza Hunt and her Father is unknown. Eliza married George Carrol and Amanda later married his son, Thomas. They were not blood relatives, so there was no cause for them to not marry. Situations like this were not uncommon in frontier days.
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