Vermont Cemetery Records

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This entry was originally written by Scott Andrew Bartley and Alice Eichholz, Ph.D., CG for Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources.

This article is part of
the Vermont Family History Research series.
History of Vermont
Vermont Vital Records
Census Records for Vermont
Background Sources for Vermont
Maps for Vermont
Vermont Land Records
Vermont Probate Records
Vermont Court Records
Vermont Tax Records
Vermont Cemetery Records
Vermont Church Records
Vermont Military Records
Vermont Periodicals, Newspapers, and Manuscript Collections
Vermont Archives, Libraries, and Societies
Vermont Immigration
Vermont Naturalizations
Ethnic Groups in Vermont
Vermont County (Probate) Resources
Vermont Town Resources
Map of Vermont


Town, church, family, and private cemeteries all exist in Vermont. The cemetery cards in the vital records microfilm of The Vermont Public Records Division constitute the only statewide cemetery index (see Vermont Vital Records for limitations). There is a Grand Army of the Republic card index of all veterans’ graves through World War II at the Vermont Historical Society Library. Since 1982 there have been a number of projects undertaken to publish some Vermont cemetery records. The Vermont Historical Society has the most extensive collection, but some town offices are known to have good indexes of their own cemeteries.

Burial Grounds of Vermont (Bradford, Vt.: Vermont Old Cemetery Association, 1991), by Arthur L. Hyde and Frances P. Hyde, lists nearly 1,900 cemeteries, indexed by town. Each town entry has a road map with cemetery location and an inventory listing number of graves, condition of cemetery, and whether gravestone inscriptions have been published and where. Joann H. Nichols, Patricia L. Haslam, and Robert M. Murphy’s Index to Known Cemetery Listings in Vermont, 4th ed. (Montpelier, Vt.: Vermont Historical Society, 1999) provides a list of known published abstracts of Vermont cemeteries whether in journals, separate publications, or in the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) collection. Both publications are available from the Vermont Historical Society Bookstore.

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